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Image of Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment, Second Edition (Addison-Wesley Professional Computing Series)
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Boycott Systemd

Finally people are beginning to wake up and understand that systemd and Lennart Poettering, who works for Red Hat, is a cancer that will destroy and splinter the Linux ecosystem. According to a new movement, boycottsystemd.org: It represents a monumental increase in complexity, an abhorrent and violent slap in the face to the Unix philosophy, and its inherent domineering and viral nature turns it into something akin to a “second kernel” that is spreading all across the Linux ecosystem. I could not agree more. systemd flies in the face of the Unix philosophy: “do one thing and do it well,”

Anaconda Fails When BIOS RAID Metadata Encountered

Anaconda (the RHEL, CentOS and Fedora installer) does not handle disks which were previously used in a BIOS or software RAID very well. Typically, it will refuse to install an OS on such disks. This is because it finds metadata relating to the RAID on the disk. The term BIOS RAID (or Fake RAID) denote a system with a BIOS that is able to do basic RAID operations on an array of disks. Such a system has no actual RAID controller. Instead, an OS driver is required. One metadata format commonly found on modern RAID systems (real as well as

Using FedUp to Update an EFI Boot Stub System to Fedora 19

FedUp (FEDora UPgrader) is the new tool for upgrading existing Fedora installs in Fedora 18 and above releases. It replaces all the previously recommended upgrade methods, i.e. PreUpgrade, DVD, USB, etc., that were available in previous Fedora releases. By the way, the Anaconda installer was totally redesigned for Fedora 18 and no longer has built-in upgrade functionality in Fedora 18 or later releases. Such functionality was delegated to FedUp. In this post, I demonstrate how to use FedUp to upgrade an EFI Boot Stub (EFISTUB) Fedora 18 system to an EFI Boot Stub Fedora 19 system. The EFI Boot Stub

Fedora FedUp Does Not Sync Distribution

Fedora FedUp is an excellent tool for upgrading your Fedora system. However you should be aware that it does not currently synchronize your system with the Fedora distribution that you upgraded to. To do that, you need to execute the following command after you finish FedUp-ing your system. # yum distro-sync From the yum man page: distribution-synchronization or distro-sync Synchronizes the installed package set with the latest packages available, this is done by either obsoleting, upgrading or downgrading as appropriate. This will “normally” do the same thing as the upgrade command however if you have the package FOO installed at

Fedora: Specify Repo when Booting Installer

To specify an installation source for Fedora, CentOS, Red Hat or Scientific Linux, use the linux repo= option at the boot prompt: For example: linux repo=cdrom:device linux repo=ftp://username:password@URL linux repo=http://URL linux repo=hd:device linux repo=nfs:options:server:/path linux repo=nfsiso:options:server:/path In these examples, cdrom refers to a CD or DVD drive, ftp refers to a location accessible by FTP, http refers to a URL accessible by HTTP, hd refers to an ISO image file accessible on a hard drive partition, nfs refers to an expanded tree of installation files accessible by NFS, and nfsiso refers to an ISO image file accessible by NFS. See