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Using PCI.IDS Database to Show PCI Vendor and Device Information in UEFI Shell

The UEFI Shell has a built-in command called pci for enumerating PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect) devices. Here is what is outputted for a Lenovo T450 using this command: fs1:> pci Seg Bus Dev Func — — — —- 00 00 00 00 ==> Bridge Device – Host/PCI bridge Vendor 8086 Device 1604 Prog Interface 0 00 00 02 00 ==> Display Controller – VGA/8514 controller Vendor 8086 Device 1616 Prog Interface 0 00 00 03 00 ==> Multimedia Device – Mixed mode device Vendor 8086 Device 160C Prog Interface 0 00 00 14 00 ==> Serial Bus Controllers – USB

Using the EFI_SHELL_PROTOCOL To Read a File

In this post, I provide the source code for a working UEFI shell application which displays the contents of an ASCII file using functionality provided by the EFI_SHELL_PROTOCOL protocol. The current version of the EFI_SHELL_PROTOCOL is 2.1 and here are the exposed protocol interfaces: typedef struct _EFI_SHELL_PROTOCOL { EFI_SHELL_EXECUTE Execute; EFI_SHELL_GET_ENV GetEnv; EFI_SHELL_SET_ENV SetEnv; EFI_SHELL_GET_ALIAS GetAlias; EFI_SHELL_SET_ALIAS SetAlias; EFI_SHELL_GET_HELP_TEXT GetHelpText; EFI_SHELL_GET_DEVICE_PATH_FROM_MAP GetDevicePathFromMap; EFI_SHELL_GET_MAP_FROM_DEVICE_PATH GetMapFromDevicePath; EFI_SHELL_GET_DEVICE_PATH_FROM_FILE_PATH GetDevicePathFromFilePath; EFI_SHELL_GET_FILE_PATH_FROM_DEVICE_PATH GetFilePathFromDevicePath; EFI_SHELL_SET_MAP SetMap; EFI_SHELL_GET_CUR_DIR GetCurDir; EFI_SHELL_SET_CUR_DIR SetCurDir; EFI_SHELL_OPEN_FILE_LIST OpenFileList; EFI_SHELL_FREE_FILE_LIST FreeFileList; EFI_SHELL_REMOVE_DUP_IN_FILE_LIST RemoveDupInFileList; EFI_SHELL_BATCH_IS_ACTIVE BatchIsActive; EFI_SHELL_IS_ROOT_SHELL IsRootShell; EFI_SHELL_ENABLE_PAGE_BREAK EnablePageBreak; EFI_SHELL_DISABLE_PAGE_BREAK DisablePageBreak; EFI_SHELL_GET_PAGE_BREAK GetPageBreak; EFI_SHELL_GET_DEVICE_NAME GetDeviceName; EFI_SHELL_GET_FILE_INFO GetFileInfo; EFI_SHELL_SET_FILE_INFO SetFileInfo; EFI_SHELL_OPEN_FILE_BY_NAME OpenFileByName; EFI_SHELL_CLOSE_FILE CloseFile;

Examine ESRT entries from UEFI Shell

This post details a simple UEFI shell utility for listing the contents of an EFI System Resource Table (ESRT). Essentially ESRT a catalog of firmware which can be updated with the UEFI UpdateCapsule mechanism described in section 7.5 of the UEFI Specification. The ESRT provides a mechanism for identifying integrated device and system firmware resources for the purposes of targeting firmware updates to those resources. Each entry in the ESRT describes a device or system firmware resource that can be targeted by a firmware update package. UEFI firmware must allocate and populate an ESRT system resource entry for itself (system

List ACPI Tables From UEFI Shell

As part of my UEFI Rescue DVD project, I decided that I wanted a small utility to list out the firmware Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) tables. ACPI defines platform-independent interfaces for hardware discovery, configuration, power management and monitoring, and these tables contain lots of useful information for low-level programmers such as myself. Here is the source code for the first version of my listacpi utility: // // Copyright (c) 2015 Finnbarr P. Murphy. All rights reserved. // // Display list of ACPI tables // // License: BSD License // #include <efi.h> #include <efilib.h> typedef struct { CHAR8 Signature[8];

Using VMware Workstation To Experiment With UEFI

VMware Workstation 9 and later appear to have a robust implementation of UEFI firmware including a full implementation of the UEFI v2.30 Shell. In this post I will show you how to set up a VMware Workstation virtual machine (VM) which allows you to experiment with the UEFI Shell and the various UEFI command line tools. I assume you are familiar with VMware Workstation and the UEFI Shell. In this post I am using VMware Workstation 9. The first step is to create a new typical 64-bit Windows 7 VM using the “I will install the operating system later” option.