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Image of Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment, Second Edition (Addison-Wesley Professional Computing Series)
Image of Linux Kernel Development (3rd Edition)
Image of Modern Operating Systems (3rd Edition)
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GNOME Shell/Cinnamon Extension Configuration Persistence

In this post I show you a simple way to add preference persistence to your Cinnamon or GNOME Shell extension using JSON.

Controlling a GNOME Shell or Cinnamon Extension using D-Bus

In this post, I demonstrate how you can add D-Bus support to a GNOME Shell or Cinnamon extension and allow a command line utility to control the operating characteristics of the extension via a command line utility.

D-Bus, Cinnamon and the GNOME Shell

This post discusses the D-Bus interface to the GNOME Shell and Cinnamon and shows you how a simple command line tool called cinnamon-tool can be used to enable or disable Cinnamon extensions via D-Bus.

Retrieving a Property using Python and GDbus

The documentation on retrieving or setting an D-Bus object’s properties using Python is pityful and mostly inaccurate. Recently GDBus has replaced dbus-glib as the preferred way to interface with D-Bus on GNOME platforms. The central concepts of D-Bus are modelled in a very similar way in dbus-glib and GDBus. Both have objects representing connections, proxies and method invocations. However there are some important differences: dbus-glib uses the D-Bus libdbus reference implementation, GDBus does not. Instead, it relies on GIO streams as transport layer, and has its own implementation for the the D-Bus connection setup and authentication. dbus-glib uses the GObject

Create a Repeated String

This question is often asked in the various Unix and Linux forums. For example, suppose you want to create a string of 50 asterisks other than str=”***********************************” Here are some of the ways I have come across over the years. perl -e ‘print “*”x50’ ruby -e ‘puts “*”*50’ awk ‘BEGIN { while (a++<50) s=s “x”; print s }’ printf ‘%*s’ “50” ‘ ‘ | tr ‘ ‘ “*” echo “*****” | sed ‘s/.*/&&&&&&&&&&/’ The following works for gawk but not oawk. echo | awk NF=51 OFS=*