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PackageKit D-Bus Abstraction Layer

PackageKit uses an abstraction layer to allow a session user to manage software packages in a secure way. This abstraction layer is based on D-Bus. Essentially, it is a set of APIs exported through a D-Bus interface. Glib, qt and python and other language bindings are available. This abstraction layer enables applications to perform high-level package operations such as add or remove a package without having to know much about package management. PolicyKit (AKA PolKit) is incorporated to provide a fine grained policy mechanism for users. D-Bus has two connections types (buses): System and Session. System interfaces normally run as

Using EFI Stub Mechanism to Upgrade to Fedora 20

The Fedora 20 (codename Heisenbug) Beta has been available for a couple of weeks now and is fairly stable according to all reports and so I decided to upgrade my main Linux development system from Fedora 19 to Fedora 20 using Fedup. FedUp consists of two components – a client used to download packages and prepare for the upgrade, and a pre-boot environment which does the actual upgrade using systemd and yum. Files are downloaded to /var/tmp/fedora-upgrade (or the directory specified by the cachedir command line option) and are automatically deleted after the upgrade completes. In my case nearly 2000

Perfect Forward Secrecy in SSH

Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) is a property of public-key encryption systems which generate random public keys per session for the purposes of key agreement which are not based on any sort of deterministic algorithm. A compromise of one message cannot lead to the compromise of another message or multiple messages. Twitter, Apache mod_ssh, SSL, TLS, and IPSec all support forward secrecy. According to the referenced Wikipedia article: Forward secrecy is designed to prevent the compromise of a long-term secret key from affecting the confidentiality of past conversations. However, forward secrecy (including perfect forward secrecy) cannot defend against a successful cryptanalysis