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Fedora Core Dumps

Core dump files are basically a snapshot of the memory being used by an application at the time the crash occurred. On Fedora, core dumps are not enabled by default. To enable core dumps: $ ulimit -c unlimited To check if core dumps are enabled, examine output of the command ulimit -c. It should be unlimited. $ ulimit -c unlimited To make the change permanent for everybody, as root edit the file /etc/security/limits.conf and add the following line: * soft core unlimited The asterisk (*) indicates that this applies for all users. This is generally a bad idea as you

WSGI, GEvent and Web Sockets

Web Sockets is an emerging technology that enables bi-directional, full-duplex communications channels, over a single TCP socket. It was originally designed to be implemented in web browsers and web servers, but it can be used by any client or server application. Tests have demonstrated Web Sockets can provide a 500:1 reduction in network traffic and 3:1 reduction in latency. Web Sockets have been around in one form or another since 2009. However specifications are still not yet fully cooked. The W3C Web Applications Group is responsible for standardizing the WebSocket API. The editor of the W3C TR is Ian Hickson

Installing Google Chrome on Fedora

Today I finally decided to drop using Firefox on my Linux systems and move to using the Google Chrome browser. I have been unhappy with Firefox for some time since design and marketing people seem to have taken control of the Firefox development process in the Firefox 3.5 days. The final straw for me was the recent EOL’ing of Firefox 4 after only a few months (I use a number of extensions that hook deep into Firefox) and the lack of websocket support (currently scheduled for Firefox 6). Much to my surprise I discovered that the Chrome browser is not

SUSE Linux

Am I the only person that thinks that SuSE Linux is the most polished of the major Linux distributions? Recently, I had to install SuSE Linux 11.2 to test some system configuration software that I had written. After spending the last couple of years working mainly with Fedora, RHEL or CentOS, it was a pleasant surprise to install SuSE Linux 11.2. Nice crisp graphics and layout! The questions were few and precise. Help was excellent. The install process flowed smoothly and logically. SuSE Linux simply just looks more professional and polished compared with Red Hat. Here are some screenshots of

GNOME Shell: How to Record Your Screen

The GNOME Shell comes with built in screen recording facilities. The Control+Shift+Alt+R keybinding starts and stops the screen recording. A red circle together with a small green rectangle are displayed in the bottom right corner of the screen when a recording is in progress. After recording is finished, a file named shell-%d%u-%c.webm is created in your home directory. In the filename, %d is the date, %u is a string that makes the filename unique, and %c is a numeric counter that is incremented each time a recording is made within a single GNOME Shell session.