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Using FedUp to Update an EFI Boot Stub System to Fedora 19

FedUp (FEDora UPgrader) is the new tool for upgrading existing Fedora installs in Fedora 18 and above releases. It replaces all the previously recommended upgrade methods, i.e. PreUpgrade, DVD, USB, etc., that were available in previous Fedora releases. By the way, the Anaconda installer was totally redesigned for Fedora 18 and no longer has built-in upgrade functionality in Fedora 18 or later releases. Such functionality was delegated to FedUp. In this post, I demonstrate how to use FedUp to upgrade an EFI Boot Stub (EFISTUB) Fedora 18 system to an EFI Boot Stub Fedora 19 system. The EFI Boot Stub

Improving the Fedora 19 Boot Experience

Recently Red Hat’s Matthias Clasen started a new discussion on the Fedora Project developer mailing list to discuss possible ways to improve the Fedora boot experience. I would love to see F19 make a good first impression. The first time you see something Fedora-related on the screen currently is the graphical grub screen, followed by the filling-in-Fedora of Plymouth, followed by the gdm login screen. Grub in particular is problematic, with a starfield background that looks like a Fedora background from a few releases ago and a progress bar that indicates the progress in ‘booting the bootloader’. There are also

Project Plymouth

Plymouth is the codename for a freedesktop.org project started in 2007 by Ray Strobe of Redhat to develop a graphical application to display a flicker free animated splash screen during the boot process while logging console text output to a log file. Fedora 10 (Cambridge) was the first release of Fedora to contain Plymouth. Development work is actively ongoing and the current release is 0.71. Plymouth is intended to be a replacement for RHGB (Red Hat Graphical Boot) which is currently used by Red Hat to provide a graphical boot display. If rhgb is part of the kernel command line,