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Configure a Host ISO-based Package Repository on a CentOS 7.2 VM

In a recent blog post, I demonstrated how to set up a local RPM repository (repo) in a VMware CentOS 7.2 VM (AKA guest) running under VMware Workstation (AKA the host.) This made the CentOS VM independent of the need for network access w.r.t. RPM package installation. However, the trade off for the ability to install packages without Internet access is the 6 GB plus increase in the size of the VM necessitated for storing all the packages and metadata. Consider the following alternative scenario. You have downloaded the CentOS-7-x86_64-Everything-1511.iso from the CentOS Project or a mirror, used the ISO

Configure a Local ISO-based Package Repository on a CentOS 7.2 VM

Consider the following scenario. You have downloaded the CentOS-7-x86_64-Everything-1511.iso from the CentOS Project or a mirror, used the ISO to create a VM in VMware Workstation, and now want to be able to access a package repository (repo) when you have no Internet access. Assume that a GNOME desktop is available on your CentOS VM and the VM is sized such that you have at least 8 Gb of free disk space. Copy the IS0 to your CentOS VM by whatever method works for you. If you have VMware Tools installed, you can just drag and drop the file using

My Thoughts on Systemd on RHEL7

From the earliest days of systemd, I have been opposed to the technology as far as it’s use on enterprise servers is concerned. Now that RHEL7 (Red Hat Enterprise Linux v7), which uses systemd instead of upstart, is starting to replace older versions of RHEL in enterprise and DOD environments, I thought I would revisit the issue. My technical reasons for opposing systemd on servers are as follows: There is no guarantee that services will be started in the same order each time a server is rebooted. Logs are binary, non-transactional and in a different format than previously. This means

McAfee Linux Operating System

The McAfee Linux Operating System (MLOS) provides a standardized Linux-based platform on which various McAfee security appliances are built. All MLOS versions so far have been built from Red Hat sources. There have been three major releases of MLOS to date: MLOS1 – Built from CentOS 5 sources MLOS2 – Built from RHEL 6 sources MLOS3 – Built from RHEL 7 sources Packages are RPM-based as you would expect but the version string is mlos1, mlos2 or mlos3 as shown in he following examples: bind-libs-9.3.6-25.mlos1.x86_64.rpm bind-utils-9.3.6-25.mlos1.x86_64.rpm Note that the operating system used by McAfee Firewall Enterprise (MFE) is SecureOS, a

UCSM Emulator Updated

Cisco UCS Platform Emulator, Release 2.2 (2cPE1), a minor point release, was announced June 4th 2014. The emulator, by the way, is based on CentOS. It adds support for the following new hardware: B260-M4 and B460-M4 blade servers C460-M4 rack server UCSB-F-LSI-400S, UCSB-F-LSI-800M, UCSB-F-FIO-785M, UCSB-F-FIO-365M storage accelerators The default configuration is changed from Mark 2 to Mark 3 blade and rack-mounted servers. All in all a solid point release which installs without a problem in VMware Workstation or Oracle Virtual Box.