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Anaconda Fails When BIOS RAID Metadata Encountered

Anaconda (the RHEL, CentOS and Fedora installer) does not handle disks which were previously used in a BIOS or software RAID very well. Typically, it will refuse to install an OS on such disks. This is because it finds metadata relating to the RAID on the disk. The term BIOS RAID (or Fake RAID) denote a system with a BIOS that is able to do basic RAID operations on an array of disks. Such a system has no actual RAID controller. Instead, an OS driver is required. One metadata format commonly found on modern RAID systems (real as well as

Using FedUp to Update an EFI Boot Stub System to Fedora 19

FedUp (FEDora UPgrader) is the new tool for upgrading existing Fedora installs in Fedora 18 and above releases. It replaces all the previously recommended upgrade methods, i.e. PreUpgrade, DVD, USB, etc., that were available in previous Fedora releases. By the way, the Anaconda installer was totally redesigned for Fedora 18 and no longer has built-in upgrade functionality in Fedora 18 or later releases. Such functionality was delegated to FedUp. In this post, I demonstrate how to use FedUp to upgrade an EFI Boot Stub (EFISTUB) Fedora 18 system to an EFI Boot Stub Fedora 19 system. The EFI Boot Stub

Fedora 18 Released

Yesterday Fedora 18 was finally released. Some major changes include NewInstaller (newUI) which is the new Anaconda installer, FedUp (FEDora UPgrader) which is a new technology for upgrading Fedora installs and Secure Boot which I have discussed elsewhere. Here are pointers to: Release Notes Common Bugs New Installer FedUp F17 to F18 upgrade notes Common Bugs has an entire section on the new Anaconda installer and is pretty extensive. You really should read this before attempting to install Fedora 18. New Installer has a general overview of the new installer, a fairly detailed explanation of the storage workflow, notes on

Fedora: Specify Repo when Booting Installer

To specify an installation source for Fedora, CentOS, Red Hat or Scientific Linux, use the linux repo= option at the boot prompt: For example: linux repo=cdrom:device linux repo=ftp://username:password@URL linux repo=http://URL linux repo=hd:device linux repo=nfs:options:server:/path linux repo=nfsiso:options:server:/path In these examples, cdrom refers to a CD or DVD drive, ftp refers to a location accessible by FTP, http refers to a URL accessible by HTTP, hd refers to an ISO image file accessible on a hard drive partition, nfs refers to an expanded tree of installation files accessible by NFS, and nfsiso refers to an ISO image file accessible by NFS. See