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Fastest Way to Gain Root Access in RHCSA7 Exam

This blog post describes the fastest way that I know to change the root password on a RHEL7 platform if you do not know or have forgotten the root password. A typical use case is the RHCSA 7 exam.

EFI Stub "/etc/os-release missing"

When I updated my Fedora 20 installation today I ran into trouble booting my system using the EFI Stub mechanism even though it booted fine using GRUB. I ended up in the Emergency Shell. Looking at the logs using journalctl, here are the relevant entries (with times and irrelevant entries removed): [ ]: Reached target Switch Root. [ ]: Started Plymouth switch root service. [ ]: Starting Switch Root… [ ]: Not switching root: /sysroot does not seem to be an OS tree. /etc/os-release is missing. …. [ ]: Failed to start Switch Root. [ ]: Startup finished in 211ms

Does Your Fedora ESP Have to be Located At /boot/efi?

Since converting to UEFI firmware some years ago, I have always mounted my ESP (EFI System Partition) at /boot/efi. Why? Because that is where Fedora and the other Linux distributions put it. But does the ESP need to be actually mounted there? Well, it turns out that the answer depends on how you are booting your UEFI Linux kernel. If you are using GRUB, the answer is yes; your ESP must be mounted at /boot/efi due to dependencies in GRUB code. If you are booting your kernel using the EFI Boot Stub mechanism, available in Linux kernel 3.3 and later,

Using EFI Stub Mechanism to Upgrade to Fedora 20

The Fedora 20 (codename Heisenbug) Beta has been available for a couple of weeks now and is fairly stable according to all reports and so I decided to upgrade my main Linux development system from Fedora 19 to Fedora 20 using Fedup. FedUp consists of two components – a client used to download packages and prepare for the upgrade, and a pre-boot environment which does the actual upgrade using systemd and yum. Files are downloaded to /var/tmp/fedora-upgrade (or the directory specified by the cachedir command line option) and are automatically deleted after the upgrade completes. In my case nearly 2000

We don’t need no stinkin bootloaders!

I have been saying for a number of years now that bootloaders such as GRUB2, rEFit, Clover and others have no place in modern EFI-based Linux systems and that the only reason to use such a bootloader is if you are on older system where you wish to be able to boot into one of a number of operating systems. The Linux Foundation is now a member of Unified EFI Forum (about time!) and has now got full access to the resources of that forum. As a result, kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman has been working on the procedures for how