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Dual Menus for a GNOME Shell 3.2 Button

One of the current limitations with the GNOME 3.2 Shell top panel buttons is that there is no support for displaying separate menus for different mouse button clicks. Yes, yes, I can hear the GNOME Shell designers say with complete authority and conviction that this use case is by design. Their answer to any criticism, constructive or otherwise, about their design is generally that they know better than anybody else and their (never-published) usability studies support their design. Just look at the Suspend versa Power Off menu option debate that erupted when the GNOME Shell was originally released! Anyway, this

More GNOME Shell Customization

If you plan to customize the GNOME Shell in any meaningful way, you need to understand the technologies underlying the GNOME Shell and understand how to write a GNOME Shell extension to provide the customization that you require. In this post I delve deeper into the technologies behind the new GNOME Shell and provide sample code for a number of simple extensions which demonstrate how to customize and extend various components of the GNOME Shell user interface. Essentially, the GNOME Shell is an integrated window manager, compositor, and application launcher. It acts as a composting window manager for the desktop

Updating the Fedora 14 JavaScript Shell

For those who are not familiar with a JavaScript shell, it is a command line interface to a JavaScript engine. Similar to Python or Ruby, the JavaScript shell has two modes of operation. You can use it as an interactive shell, in which you type JavaScript code at a prompt and get instant results, or you can invoke a JavaScript program. The easiest way that I know of to build a JavaScript shell on Fedora is to download and build either the SpiderMonkey or TraceMonkey JavaScript engine, both of which come with a JavaScript Shell. TraceMonkey recently replaced SpiderMonkey in

Microsoft SUA JavaScript Shell

Recently I needed to test some JavaScript code on a Microsoft Vista Ultimate operating system using the command line. This is something that I have done before on Linux platforms using a JavaScript shell but had never done on a Microsoft platform. For those who are not familiar with a JavaScript shell, it is a command line interface to a JavaScript engine. Similar to Python or Ruby, the JavaScript shell has two modes of operation. You can use it as an interactive shell, in which you type JavaScript code at a prompt and get instant results, or you can invoke

JavaScript File Object

As you are probably aware JavaScript engines such as SpiderMonkey typically do not allow access to the local filesystem for reasons of security.  To enable developers to test the scripts from a command line, js includes the load() function which enables you to load one or more JavaScript scripts into the SpiderMonkey engine.  However this is not sufficient for our purposes as no means is provided to write to the filesystem.  Looking more closely at the source code, I noticed support for File objects.  This support is not enabled by default however.  It is not sufficient to simply recompile SpiderMonkey