Translate

Image of Operating System Concepts
Image of Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment, Second Edition (Addison-Wesley Professional Computing Series)
Image of Android Wireless Application Development
Image of Linux Kernel Development (3rd Edition)

Using EFI Stub Mechanism to Upgrade to Fedora 20

The Fedora 20 (codename Heisenbug) Beta has been available for a couple of weeks now and is fairly stable according to all reports and so I decided to upgrade my main Linux development system from Fedora 19 to Fedora 20 using Fedup. FedUp consists of two components – a client used to download packages and prepare for the upgrade, and a pre-boot environment which does the actual upgrade using systemd and yum. Files are downloaded to /var/tmp/fedora-upgrade (or the directory specified by the cachedir command line option) and are automatically deleted after the upgrade completes. In my case nearly 2000

GRUB2 and Post-MBR Gap

Section 3.2 of the current GRUB2 986431 and 979805 indicate not. In 986431, a Dell PC, the first partition (containing a Dell utility) started at sector 36 (maybe a 4K sector disk?) and in 979805, a refurbished Lenovo laptop, the first partition started at sector 28. The responses to these bug reports by some people was interesting: The best thing to do might be to contact NBWN and let them know that their disk partitioning is incompatible with Fedora The standard here is what the Windows installer does, not what Dell’s inept manufacturing process produces. Have you called Dell tech

Boot Linux Without An Initramfs

So you think you always need an initramfs to boot your Linux system. Not true and I will show you how. For example, here is my GRUB2 (/boot/grub2/grub.cfg) configuration file for Fedora 17: menuentry ‘Fedora Linux, no initramfs’ { set root=’hd0,msdos1′ linux /vmlinuz-3.3.4-5.fc17.i686.PAE rootfstype=ext4 root=/dev/sda2 rd.md=0 rd.lvm=0 rd.dm=0 SYSFONT=True KEYTABLE=us rd.luks=0 LANG=en_US.UTF-8 } Note there is no line specifying an initramfs! I was not aware that this was possible until I saw it demonstrated by Harald Hoyer. By the way, in case you were wondering, yes I manually edit my GRUB2 configuration file rather than using the numerous crazy GRUB2

Improving the Fedora 19 Boot Experience

Recently Red Hat’s Matthias Clasen started a new discussion on the Fedora Project developer mailing list to discuss possible ways to improve the Fedora boot experience. I would love to see F19 make a good first impression. The first time you see something Fedora-related on the screen currently is the graphical grub screen, followed by the filling-in-Fedora of Plymouth, followed by the gdm login screen. Grub in particular is problematic, with a starfield background that looks like a Fedora background from a few releases ago and a progress bar that indicates the progress in ‘booting the bootloader’. There are also

Fedora 16 GRUB2 Limitations

Got a MBR disk and GRUB2 core.img will not fit between the MBR and sector 63? This is common with on disks on which Windows XP was installed prior to trying to install Fedora 16. Typically you will receive a message similar to this: Your embedding area is unusually small. core.img won’t fit in it.. Embedding is not possible. GRUB can only be installed in this setup by using blocklists. However, blocklists are UNRELIABLE and their use is discouraged.. Here is what the Fedora deveopers have to say about this issue: Versions of Fedora prior to Fedora 16, and many