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Using PCI.IDS Database to Show PCI Vendor and Device Information in UEFI Shell

The UEFI Shell has a built-in command called pci for enumerating PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect) devices. Here is what is outputted for a Lenovo T450 using this command: fs1:> pci Seg Bus Dev Func — — — —- 00 00 00 00 ==> Bridge Device – Host/PCI bridge Vendor 8086 Device 1604 Prog Interface 0 00 00 02 00 ==> Display Controller – VGA/8514 controller Vendor 8086 Device 1616 Prog Interface 0 00 00 03 00 ==> Multimedia Device – Mixed mode device Vendor 8086 Device 160C Prog Interface 0 00 00 14 00 ==> Serial Bus Controllers – USB

RHCSA Preparation - Script to Configure a Simple OpenLDAP Server

The ability to quickly configure an LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) client for accessing user and group accounts is one of the skills you are expected to have when you sit the Red Hat RHSCA exam. LDAP is a application-level protocol for accessing and maintaining distributed directory services over an IP-based network. It is specified in a series of RFCs (Request for Comments) using ASN.1. The latest LDAP specification is Version 3, published as RFC 4511. Typically, at a minimum, LDAP is used to facilitate centralized user and group account administration. Instead of storing user and group account information locally

Bash-like Customizable Prompt in Korn Shell

Bash has built-in support for extensive PS1 prompt customization using parameterless macros. As a result many people customize their shell prompts. There is no equivalent built-in support for PS1 customization in ksh93 but such support can easily be added using a discipline function. This post provides an example of such a PS1 discipline function. Add the following discipline function to your ~/.kshrc and ensure that ~/.kshrc is included in your ~/.profile shell startup script which, by the way, only gets executed at login if ksh93 is your default shell. function PS1.set { typeset prefix remaining=${.sh.value} var= n= k= set -A

Examining TPM2 ACPI Table

The Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) specification was developed to establish industry common interfaces enabling robust operating system directed motherboard device configuration and power management of both devices and entire platforms. This specification has gone from strength to strength over the years and is now maintained by the UEFI Forum. The current version is 6.1. Over the years, the Trusted Computing Group (TCG) has developed various specifications defining an ACPI table and basic methods for use on a TCG compliant platform. The goal is that the ACPI table and ACPI namespace objects provide sufficient information to an operating system

Accessing TPM Functionality From UEFI Shell - Part 1

A Trusted Platform Module (TPM) is, traditionally, a hardware device (chip) designed to enable commodity computing platforms (think laptop or personal computer) to achieve greater levels of security than non-TPM equipped platform. There are over 600 million installed TPMs, mostly in high-end laptops made by Lenovo, HP, Dell, Toshiba and others. TPMs are manufactured by many chip producers including Atmel, STMicroelectronics and Toshiba. Via it’s Trusted Execution Technology (TXT), Intel now incorporates TPM functionality in many of its current processors. TPM technology is specified by the Trusted Computing Group (TCG), an industry consortium that includes Intel, Microsoft, AMD, IBM, HP,