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My Thoughts on Systemd on RHEL7

From the earliest days of systemd, I have been opposed to the technology as far as it’s use on enterprise servers is concerned. Now that RHEL7 (Red Hat Enterprise Linux v7), which uses systemd instead of upstart, is starting to replace older versions of RHEL in enterprise and DOD environments, I thought I would revisit the issue. My technical reasons for opposing systemd on servers are as follows: There is no guarantee that services will be started in the same order each time a server is rebooted. Logs are binary, non-transactional and in a different format than previously. This means

Revisiting Systemd D-Bus Interfaces

In a May 2013 blog post I examined the then systemd D-Bus interface. At that time the systemd version string was 208. In this short blog I will discuss hostnamectl/hostnamed and timedatectl/timedatectl functionality as it relates to the systemd Dbus. You can use the following dbus-send command to find out what’s available on the D-Bus system bus: # dbus-send –system –print-reply –dest=”org.freedesktop.DBus” \ /org/freedesktop/DBus org.freedesktop.DBus.ListActivatableNames method return sender=org.freedesktop.DBus -> dest=:1.137 reply_serial=2 array [ string “org.freedesktop.DBus” string “org.freedesktop.login1” string “org.fedoraproject.Setroubleshootd” string “org.freedesktop.machine1” string “org.freedesktop.ColorManager” string “com.redhat.problems.configuration” string “org.freedesktop.systemd1” string “org.freedesktop.Avahi” string “org.freedesktop.PolicyKit1” string “org.freedesktop.ModemManager1” string “org.bluez” string “org.freedesktop.hostname1” string “org.freedesktop.NetworkManager” string

Boycott Systemd

Finally people are beginning to wake up and understand that systemd and Lennart Poettering, who works for Red Hat, is a cancer that will destroy and splinter the Linux ecosystem. According to a new movement, boycottsystemd.org: It represents a monumental increase in complexity, an abhorrent and violent slap in the face to the Unix philosophy, and its inherent domineering and viral nature turns it into something akin to a “second kernel” that is spreading all across the Linux ecosystem. I could not agree more. systemd flies in the face of the Unix philosophy: “do one thing and do it well,”

Exploring PackageKit's GNOME Software

Fedora 20 (codename Heisenbug) Beta was released on November 12th 2013. One of the accepted system wide change proposals for this release was to replace the existing gnome-packagekit frontends (gpk-update-viewer and gpk-application) with a new unified and more user-centric application. A quick high-level overview of PackageKit first. It is essentially a framework which consists of frontends such as yum which communicate with backends such as PackageKit-yum via an abstraction layer based on D-Bus. Essentially, it is a set of APIs exported through a D-Bus interface. Glib, qt and python and other language bindings are available. This abstraction layer enables applications

PackageKit D-Bus Abstraction Layer

PackageKit uses an abstraction layer to allow a session user to manage software packages in a secure way. This abstraction layer is based on D-Bus. Essentially, it is a set of APIs exported through a D-Bus interface. Glib, qt and python and other language bindings are available. This abstraction layer enables applications to perform high-level package operations such as add or remove a package without having to know much about package management. PolicyKit (AKA PolKit) is incorporated to provide a fine grained policy mechanism for users. D-Bus has two connections types (buses): System and Session. System interfaces normally run as