Translate

Image of RHCE Red Hat Certified Engineer Linux Study Guide (Exam RH302) (Certification Press)
Image of Modern Operating Systems (3rd Edition)
Image of Android Wireless Application Development
Image of XSLT 2.0 and XPath 2.0 Programmer's Reference (Programmer to Programmer)

Boycott Systemd

Finally people are beginning to wake up and understand that systemd and Lennart Poettering, who works for Red Hat, is a cancer that will destroy and splinter the Linux ecosystem.

According to a new movement, boycottsystemd.org:

It represents a monumental increase in complexity, an abhorrent and violent slap in the face to the Unix philosophy, and its inherent domineering and viral nature turns it into something akin to a “second kernel” that is spreading all across the Linux ecosystem.

I could not agree more.

systemd flies in the face of the Unix philosophy: “do one thing and do it well,” representing a complex collection of dozens of tightly coupled binaries1. Its responsibilities grossly exceed that of an init system, as it goes on to handle power management, device management, mount points, cron, disk encryption, socket API/inetd, syslog, network configuration, login/session management, readahead, GPT partition discovery, container registration, hostname/locale/time management, and other things. Keep it simple, stupid.

Red Hat is now, via Poettering and others, driving Linux in a direction which is fundamentally at odds with the classical Unix philosophy of Linux distributions over the years. It started with their crazy Network Manager daemon a few years ago and now is in full swing with systemd and other “enhancements”.

Systemd adds a serious level of complexity, risk and cost to deploying RHEL7 in an enterprise. Binary logs, for example, mean that an enterprise will have to redo their existing logging infrastructure. That costs real time and money. For these reasons and more, I would not be surprised if the move to RHEL7 in current RHEL deployments is close to non-existent.

All hail Lennart Poettering!

Comments are closed.