Translate

Image of Beginning Google Maps API 3
Image of XSLT 2.0 and XPath 2.0 Programmer's Reference (Programmer to Programmer)
Image of Linux Kernel Development (3rd Edition)
Image of RHCE Red Hat Certified Engineer Linux Study Guide (Exam RH302) (Certification Press)

Using The PackageKit Console Frontend

This post explores using the PackageKit command line utilities – pkcon, pkmon and pkgenpack.

Fedora 19, Simple-Scan and Canon LiDE Scanners

Recently I updated my Fedora 19 system and all appeared to be well until I wanted to quickly scan in a document to send to a colleague. The scanner I used is my old trustly Canon LiDE 30. Simple-scan refused to work because it claimed that no scanners were detected. Using lsusb, I quickly determined that the scanner was detected: # lsusb Bus 002 Device 004: ID 045e:076c Microsoft Corp. Comfort Mouse 4500 Bus 002 Device 003: ID 045e:0734 Microsoft Corp. Wireless Optical Desktop 700 Bus 002 Device 002: ID 8087:0024 Intel Corp. Integrated Rate Matching Hub Bus 002 Device

Precision Time Protocol

Most Linux users are familiar with the Network Time Protocol (NTP) but few are aware of Precision Time Protocol (PTP) which is another protocol that can be used to synchronize clocks throughout a computer network. PTP is defined in IEEE 1588-2008 (Standard for a Precision Clock Synchronization Protocol for Networked Measurement and Control Systems). PTP is designed for computing systems requiring time accuracies beyond those attainable using NTP, i.e. high time precision systems. By the way, NTP is documented in RFC 5905. PTP is an on-the-wire protocol and typically includes hardware support in the servers, clients and switches to capture

OSv – Designed for the Cloud

This blog is mostly about Linux-related topics but from time to time covers interesting other OS-related technology. One such interesting new technology is OSv, which was designed from the ground up to execute a single application on top of a hypervisor, resulting in superior performance and effortless management. Developed by a number of the initial developers of KVM, including Avi Kivity, OSv was designed to give near-hardware level access efficiency for Java VMs. OSv also reduces the memory and CPU overhead imposed by traditional OSes. Evidently ZFS is the default filesystem. Interestingly, OSv is implemented in C++, using templates, which