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Over 350K LPI Certification Attempts

According to a press release today by the Linux Professional Institute (LPI): The Linux Professional Institute (LPI), the world’s premier Linux certification organization, announced that in 2012 the organization surpassed two significant milestones: delivering over 350,000 exams and 120,000 certifications worldwide since the organization’s inception. I suspect that most of these examination attempts were actually the two CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI entry level exams (currently LXO-101 and LX0-102), rather than LPIC-2 or LPIC-3. It would be interesting to see a breakdown of these numbers because they imply a success of about 65% for LKO-101 and LXO-102. This matches my

SSSD – System Security Service Daemon

System Security Service (SSSD) was initially developed to be the primary client component for FreeIPA but later became an independent project in its own right. The primary role of SSSD is to provide access to identity and authentication resources through a common framework that can provide caching and offline support to a system. When a user logs into a network with centrally managed accounts, the user information and credentials are automatically stored in an SSSD cache on the user’s system. For offline support, SSSD authenticates the user’s credentials against the local SSSD cache. Authentication through SSSD enables LDAP, NIS, and

Time to Abandon Systemd?

Systemd, an initd replacement, is an abomination visited initially upon Fedora users by Lennart Poettering and Kay Sievers and later adopted by a number of other distributions. Even Alan Cox, who recently announced his departure from Intel and Linux kernel development, is unhappy with some aspects of it. From a recent post on his Google+ page: So Fedora 18 seems to be the worst Red Hat distro I’ve ever seen. The new installer is unusable, the updater is buggy. When you get it running the default desktop has been eviscerated to the point of being slightly less useful than a

Fedora 18 Released

Yesterday Fedora 18 was finally released. Some major changes include NewInstaller (newUI) which is the new Anaconda installer, FedUp (FEDora UPgrader) which is a new technology for upgrading Fedora installs and Secure Boot which I have discussed elsewhere. Here are pointers to: Release Notes Common Bugs New Installer FedUp F17 to F18 upgrade notes Common Bugs has an entire section on the new Anaconda installer and is pretty extensive. You really should read this before attempting to install Fedora 18. New Installer has a general overview of the new installer, a fairly detailed explanation of the storage workflow, notes on

What Is Wrong With Systemd?

What’s wrong with systemd? Lots! Frankly the design is appallingly bad. To quote from a recent post on Slashdot post: It abstracts services to the point you can’t find them. It breaks existing sysv startup/shutdown scripts for commercial software. (The reply from vendors of commercial software is pretty unison: We don’t support systems with systemd) It assumes start and stop are always oneliners, so you end up writing startup/shutdown scripts anyhow cause systemd isn’t good enough. It breaks standard runlevels. It uses the old MSDOS .ini file format, which is severely sysadmin-unfriendly (grep doesn’t understand MSDOS [section]s, for example). …