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Display UEFI Firmware Version, Vendor, Revision and Build Date

In this post, I show you how to obtain various information (vendor, version, revision and build date) about your UEFI firmware via the SMBIOS table.

Most Fedora Users Do Not Need Avahi Service

Avahi is a technology which facilitates service discovery on a local network via the mDNS/DNS-SD protocol suite. In theory, this enables you to plug your computer into a network and instantly be able to view other people who you can chat with, find printers to print to or find files being shared. Avahi also allows your computer to advertise running network services. Avahi implements the Zeroconf specification, mDNS, DNS-SD and RFC 3927/IPv4LL. It also uses D-Bus. Compatible technology is found in Bonjour/mDNSResponder. By the way, Avahi is the Malagasy name and scientific Latin name of a genus of woolly lemur,

Determine State of a Port Using Telnet

Using telnet, you can make an educated guess whether a port on a remote host is open, closed or blocked by a firewall by the error message it throws. If you get no error message, the port is open. If you get an error like the following: Unable to connect to remote host: No route to host you are almost certainly seeing a blocked (by firewall or whatever) port. If you get an error like the following: Unable to connect to remote host: Connection timed out the port is almost certainly a closed port.

Standard Streams Buffering

STDIO (Standard In/Out) streams are either: Fully buffered – the buffer is not flushed until the buffer is full. Line buffered – the buffer is flushed when a complete line is in the buffer or the buffer is full. Unbuffered – the buffer is flushed whenever there is data in the buffer. This is usually at the end of a call to a stdio function such as putc or printf. By default, stderr is not fully buffered and stdin and stdout are not fully buffered unless the system can determine that the stream is not connected to a tty device

UEFI Memory V E820 Memory

In this post I discuss the differences between how UEFI hands off memory to the Linux Kernel and how old-fashioned BIOSes handled off memory via E820.