Translate

Image of Beginning Google Maps API 3
Image of Modern Operating Systems (3rd Edition)
Image of RHCE Red Hat Certified Engineer Linux Study Guide (Exam RH302) (Certification Press)
Image of XSLT 2.0 and XPath 2.0 Programmer's Reference (Programmer to Programmer)

UEFI Secure Boot

A few days ago, Red Hat developer Matthew Garrett blogged about the possibility that Linux could be locked out of the next generation of UEFI-enabled PCs. The technical press picked up the story and it spread like wildfire as if it were new news. The truth, however, is that this issue has been publicly known about in the Linux world since at least May 2011. For example, Jake Edge wrote a long and detailed article about this very issue in the June 15th issue of Linux Weekly News. Moreover, by their own admission, Red Hat actively participates in the UEFI

Could not update .ICEauthority

Today I hit the Could not update .ICEauthority /home//.ICEauthority error message when I rebooted one of my Fedora 15 systems and attempted to login. The fix is trivial. Login on a virtual terminal or via SSH, become root and execute: chmod -R /home/ rm /var/lib/gdm/.ICEauthority* Typically this problem occurs when your .ICEauthority file is no longer owned by you because you ran some graphical applications as sudo root. So what is the .ICEauthority file and what is its purpose? Basically ICE is a acronym for the Inter-Client Exchange protocol which is an inter process communication protocol with authentication, protocol negotiation

Soft Hyphens

A soft hyphen (U+00AD, ­) is a type of hyphen used to specify a place in text where a hyphenated break is allowed without forcing a line break in an inconvenient place if the text is re-flowed. Recently I had to deal with the questions of how to handle soft hyphens in a web-based application and quickly discovered that soft hyphens were not as simple a topic as I initially thought. Why should a web developer care one iota about soft hyphens? It is because the use of soft hyphens, while not yet universal, is becoming more common in languages

Upgrade Fedora 15 to Fedora 16

It goes without saying that you should back up all essential data and files before attempting an upgrade. As superuser, drop down to runlevel 3 (init 3), i.e. non-GUI multiuser and execute the following commands in the order that they are shown below. # rpm –import https://fedoraproject.org/static/A82BA4B7.txt # yum -y update yum # yum clean all # yum -y –releasever=16 –disableplugin=presto distro-sync That is it. Reboot your system to ensure that the upgrade to Fedora 16 was successful. Note that your multiboat loader will still be Legacy GRUB and partitioning on the boot fdisk will still be MBR (Master Boot

Install NFS Server on SUSE Linux 11

Coming from a Red Hat Enterprise Linux background, I recently had to install and configure an NFS server on a SUSE Linux 11.2 platform and was a bit surprised to find that the NFS server package was called nfs-kernel-server instead of just nfs-server or just nfs. Here are the steps to install and start up the NFS server: # yast2 -i nfs-kernel-server # or zypper install -y nfs-kernel-server # chkconfig –add nfsserver nfsserver 0:off 1:off 2:off 3:on 4:off 5:on 6:off # /etc/init.d/nfsserver start Starting kernel based NFS server: idmapd mountd startd nfsd sm-notify done # service nfsservice status Checking for